Tag Archives: fantasy

Sunday Snippet, January 13, 2019

More from Hedge House, a paranormal/urban fantasy, almost finished first draft that I’m hoping to release before the end of the year. This snippet picks up from last week’s.

“What happened after the two of you left for Tulsa?”

Cara shook her head. “We still weren’t close. She’d never gotten to know me, had no idea what I liked, tried to force me into the mold of her ideal daughter. We’re still not close. She’s still part of that church and I’m… not.”

Cara busied herself threading the chain through the wire loop on the pendant. Why was she telling Tamira all of this? She had just met her and wasn’t entirely sure the woman liked her or approved of her. Not that she needed anyone’s approval… Craved it, maybe, but didn’t need it.

“Thank you,” she said. “For the chain.” She fastened it around her neck and turned as the door chimed, stiffening as she saw who was in the doorway.

 

Tentative Blurb:

When Cara Hawthorne returns to the childhood home she had been torn away from twenty years earlier, she thinks it will be to do nothing more than settle her grandmother’s estate and return to her job as a junior lawyer at a prestigious law firm in Tulsa.

But every nook and cranny of the house and gardens unearths long-buried memories, and when the town’s mayor sets his sights on her and the property she finds herself caught up in a centuries old battle with powers she has only barely begun to understand

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

Advertisements

7 Comments

Filed under writing

Rainbow Snippet for 1-12-2019

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from one of the books of the Academy of the Accord series, showcasing two of my favorite characters. (Okay, yes, they’re all my favorites, but Yhon and Bry – especially Bry – hold a special place all their own.) I was going to skip ahead and show you an older Brythel, so you could see the changes in him, but decided to finish this bit instead, so I’ll get to that next month.

For those joining late:

Yhonshel is a Tuanae, both wizard and warder. He is a captain, one of the three seconds in command at the garrison of the academy, and he is also a Master wizard and one of the three deputy headmasters at the academy. He’s quiet and gentle and soft-spoken but I don’t recommend ever making him truly angry.

Brythel is one of the cadets. He is timid and nervous and very unsure of himself. (One of the reasons I love Bry is that he probably grew and changed more than any other character I’ve ever written.)

The students were introduced to Yhonshel on their tour of the castle and he invited any of them who were interested in music to come find him during free time. Bry has taken him up on his offer.

Picking up from last week’s snippet:

Hesitantly he began to play, Yhonshel watching him with a gentle intensity.

“Relax,” he said softly. “Pretend I’m not here.”

Brythel wanted to protest that he couldn’t do that, that it was Yhonshel’s presence that he wanted almost as much as he wanted music, but he swallowed the words and nodded.

“Close your eyes,” Yhonshel said. “You are safe here. There is nothing to fear.  Just close your eyes and breathe deep and easy and imagine that you are in the safest place you can think of.” He smiled as he saw the boy relax in response to the sound of his voice. “You are safe,” he murmured. “Now, play.”

Brythel began playing, hesitantly at first, then with growing confidence as the music began to weave its magic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 Comments

Filed under writing

Sunday Snippet, January 6, 2019

More from Hedge House, a paranormal/urban fantasy, almost finished first draft.  (One of my writing goals for this year is to get it finished, beta read, revised, and published.)

This picks up from last week’s snippet.

Tamira turned, a silver chain in her hand. 

“Belle wanted to make sure you had this,” she said, handing it to her. “But only if you found the pendant that belonged with it.” She nodded toward the stone in Cara’s hand.

“My father made this,” Cara said, frowning.

“I know. He mined the crystal, charged it with its purpose, wrapped it with wire, and gave it to you. When your mother took you away, Belle was afraid she’d find it and throw it away.”

Cara shook her head. “I hid it in the garden. I was afraid she’d do the same thing.”

“You didn’t trust your mother, did you?”

Cara hesitated. “She was never… We were never close. I spent most of my time with my father or grandmother or Jacob. She never seemed to care much. And when my father died…” She frowned. “I don’t remember much of what went on, but I know she was… angry.” Her frown deepened as she found herself struggling with a wide range of emotions she couldn’t quite identify as memories came back to her. “I remember… I remember her yelling a lot, saying that she hated him, like she blamed him for dying, like it was his fault that he died.”

 

Tentative Blurb:

When Cara Hawthorne returns to the childhood home she had been torn away from twenty years earlier, she thinks it will be to do nothing more than settle her grandmother’s estate and return to her job as a junior lawyer at a prestigious law firm in Tulsa.

But every nook and cranny of the house and gardens unearths long-buried memories, and when the town’s mayor sets his sights on her and the property she finds herself caught up in a centuries old battle with powers she has only barely begun to understand

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

5 Comments

Filed under writing

Rainbow Snippet for 1-5-2019

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from one of the books of the Academy of the Accord series, showcasing two of my favorite characters. (Okay, yes, they’re all my favorites, but Yhon and Bry – especially Bry – hold a special place all their own.) I was going to skip ahead and show you an older Brythel, so you could see the changes in him, but decided to finish this bit instead, so I’ll get to that next month.

For those joining late:

Yhonshel is a Tuanae, both wizard and warder. He is a captain, one of the three seconds in command at the garrison of the academy, and he is also a Master wizard and one of the three deputy headmasters at the academy. He’s quiet and gentle and soft-spoken but I don’t recommend ever making him truly angry.

Brythel is one of the cadets. He is timid and nervous and very unsure of himself. (One of the reasons I love Bry is that he probably grew and changed more than any other character I’ve ever written.)

The students were introduced to Yhonshel on their tour of the castle and he invited any of them who were interested in music to come find him during free time. Bry has taken him up on his offer.

Picking up from last week’s snippet:

“Is that magic?” Brythel asked. “What you did with the chairs and the lute?”

“It is indeed,” Yhonshel smiled. “Levitation spells.”

Brythel nodded, his mind whirling.

“What are you thinking?” Yhonshel asked gently.

Brythel flushed. “I just… I never thought magic was useful.”

Yhonshel’s laugh was warm.  “I always forget what it was like, not knowing about magic.” He smiled and stroked the strings of his lute and Brythel flushed again, fumbling his instrument out of its wrappings.

“Bryth? What are you afraid of?”

He looked up and the warmth and caring in the murky grey-green eyes made his throat close up for a moment. “Nothing,” he said defensively, then his shoulders slumped. “Everything,” he said, his voice full of misery. “I – I’m not supposed to have this,” he said, touching his lute. “It… My stepfather, he…He doesn’t approve of music and he… he burned everything he could find of my father’s but I hid this and some papers… music. My mother said once that they were music but I didn’t understand – I don’t understand.”

“You will,” Yhonshel assured him with a soft smile. “You’ll learn to read music and…”

“And what?” Brythel asked, then flinched away, flushing at his boldness in asking, fully expecting to be hit for the question.

“And so much more than you can even begin to grasp,” Yhonshel replied. He held the boy’s gaze for a long moment. “You are very special, Bryth. Never forget that.”

“Y-yes, sir.”

Yhonshel smiled and touched the back of his neck lightly, his smile deepening as the boy relaxed at his touch. “Play for me.”

 

 

 

 

 

9 Comments

Filed under writing

Sunday Snippet, December 30, 2018

Skipping a few paragraphs in Hedge House, a paranormal/urban fantasy.  A customer has come into the shop and Cara is browsing while Tamira helps her.

She moved on the jewelry display as Tamira finished up with the customer. Engrossed, she vaguely heard the door chimes as the woman left.

“Finding anything?”

Tamira was suddenly at her elbow, her voice holding a slight challenge.

Cara shook her head. “Nothing here is my taste,” she replied. “I can appreciate the beauty of the pieces, but I can’t imagine wearing any of them. I do need to get a chain for this, though.” She pulled the Herkimer pendant from her pocket, holding it in her closed fist for a moment before slowly opening her hand to show Tamira.

“I think I have just exactly what you need.” She smiled and motioned for Cara to follow her to the back room. 

Cara followed and paused in the doorway. She wasn’t sure what she had expected – maybe a desk and office chair and computer for bookkeeping creating an oasis in a sea of boxes and unsorted stock – but that wasn’t what she saw. There was a desk and office chair and computer, but the walls of half the room were taken up with counters and lined with shelves that held bottles of various shapes and sizes along with baskets and bags. The counters were host to several mortars and pestles and a large number of small slow cookers.

“You can come in,” Tamira said, looking up from a drawer she was searching through.

Cara shrugged but said nothing. She felt unwelcome in the shop and really just wanted to go outside and maybe walk along the main street and look at the shops until Jacob came back.

She had a sudden urge to break down and cry but she wouldn’t do it here, not in front of this woman.

 

 

Tentative Blurb:

When Cara Hawthorne returns to the childhood home she had been torn away from twenty years earlier, she thinks it will be to do nothing more than settle her grandmother’s estate and return to her job as a junior lawyer at a prestigious law firm in Tulsa.

But every nook and cranny of the house and gardens unearths long-buried memories, and when the town’s mayor sets his sights on her and the property she finds herself caught up in a centuries old battle with powers she has only barely begun to understand

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

6 Comments

Filed under writing

Rainbow Snippet for 12-29-2018

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Continuing from last week.

Hesitantly Brythel sat in the other chair. “Sh-should I call you ‘Master” or Captain’, sir?”

“That depends on whether I’m acting as a wizard or a Warrior, I suppose. So when we’re here call me Yhonshel.” He tilted his head. “What should I call you?”

“B-brythel, sir.  My name is Brythel.”

“I’m pleased to meet you, Brythel.”

Yhonshel held out his hand and Brythel accepted it hesitantly, but as the Tuanae’s hand closed around his he felt a wave of comfort and safety and acceptance that nearly overwhelmed him.

“Shall we begin?” Yhonshel asked.

Brythel nodded, reluctantly letting go of his hand. “I – I don’t know where to start.”

“Start by getting your instrument out of its wrappings,” Yhonshel said. He glanced round the room and held out a hand and another lute left a table and floated to it.

“Is that magic?” Brythel asked. “What you did with the chairs and the lute?”

“It is indeed,” Yhonshel smiled. “Levitation spells.”

Brythel nodded, his mind whirling.

“What are you thinking?” Yhonshel asked gently.

Brythel flushed. “I just… I never thought magic was useful.”

 

 

 

 

 

7 Comments

Filed under writing

Sunday Snippet, December 23, 2018

More from Hedge House, a paranormal/urban fantasy, almost finished first draft.

 

“The shop,” Tamira said as if they hadn’t detoured from the original question, “buys and sells antiques. Furniture, art, figurines, books.”

“Mostly,” Cara added dryly. “Or so Jacob tells me although he won’t say what else it sells.”

“A few homemade items,” Tamira replied. She studied Cara for a moment. “Jacob says you’re not sure if you’re staying in Crossroads?”

Cara shook her head. “I’m… torn. But if I don’t, I’ll sell you the business for a silver dollar.”

Tamira smiled and some sort of tension seemed to ease, leaving the air more breathable, and leaving Cara wondering why she had specified a silver dollar.

“I’m going to leave you two ladies to get acquainted,” Jacob said. “I need to run to the hardware store and the farm supply. I’ll be back in an hour or so.”

The two women stared at each other in silence after he left, neither one knowing quite what to say. 

“So,” Cara broke the silence. “I’m afraid I don’t know much about antiques so I’m not going to be much help around here. But on the other hand, I also won’t try to tell you what to do or how to do it.”

Her words seemed to amuse Tamira and Cara felt a flash of irritation. 

“When I meet with the lawyer I’ll have him take care of transferring ownership of the shop.”

 

Tentative Blurb:

When Cara Hawthorne returns to the childhood home she had been torn away from twenty years earlier, she thinks it will be to do nothing more than settle her grandmother’s estate and return to her job as a junior lawyer at a prestigious law firm in Tulsa.

But every nook and cranny of the house and gardens unearths long-buried memories, and when the town’s mayor sets his sights on her and the property she finds herself caught up in a centuries old battle with powers she has only barely begun to understand

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

3 Comments

Filed under writing

Rainbow Snippet for 12-22-2018

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

More of Yhon and Bry and the music lesson…

A slight movement caught his eye and he looked up. The Tuanae stood in the doorway of a second staircase.

“M-master Yhonshel,” he stammered, his fear returning. “C-captain.”

The man inclined his head briefly and stepped forward. “Welcome,” he said, his voice soft. “How may I help you?”

“I – I want to learn to play,” Brythel blurted out. “Sir,” he added in a rush of fear.

Yhonshel smiled. “What do you have there?” he asked, nodding to the object Brythel was clutching.

“A – a lute. I-it was my father’s and I… I can play it a little bit but I want to learn, really learn. Please, sir. I – I know I’m not a wizard but you said…”  Brythel’s voice faltered as he tried to regain control of himself.

“I know what I said, and I meant it,” Yhonshel replied. “Come, have a seat.” He gestured and two chairs moved from where they were stacked in a corner and settled in front of a small table.

“Y-you would teach me?” Brythel barely dared to hope.

“I would be honored,” Yhonshel replied as he sat down.

 

 

 

 

 

8 Comments

Filed under writing

Sunday Snippet, December 16, 2018

Picking up from last week in Hedge House, a paranormal/urban fantasy WiP.  Cara is getting to know Tamira, the woman who runs the shop her grandmother owned.

“Only if it makes you more aware of how your actions create ripples.”

“It wasn’t her actions, Tamira,” Jacob said, a low warning growl in his voice. “Put the blame where it’s due. Her absence was her mother’s doing. She’s the one that took her away from everything that she knew and got her exposed to that crazy cult.” He looked at Cara. “Apologies,” he said. “But that’s what it is.”

“You won’t get any argument from me about that,” Cara said. “I happen to agree with you. The things they did…” Her mind shied away from the events even as part of her knew with a deep certainty that Jacob did know… But how could he?

She shook her head sharply to clear the thought and pushed it down. Now was not the time to lose her mind or to explore random feelings and questions and knowings.

She smiled at Tamira. “Tell me about the shop?” she asked. “I don’t seem to remember it from when I was little.”

“Belle didn’t open it until after you’d been taken away,” the woman replied. “She started it because…” Tamira caught Jacob’s gaze and something seemed to flow between them. “Because she needed something to occupy her time after losing her son and granddaughter.”

Cara fixed her with an intense gaze, wondering what she had been going to say, but Jacob touched her shoulder and she turned to look at him.

“Not yet, Cara,” he murmured. “You’re not ready to know that yet.”

 

Tentative Blurb:

When Cara Hawthorne returns to the childhood home she had been torn away from twenty years earlier, she thinks it will be to do nothing more than settle her grandmother’s estate and return to her job as a junior lawyer at a prestigious law firm in Tulsa.

But every nook and cranny of the house and gardens unearths long-buried memories, and when the town’s mayor sets his sights on her and the property she finds herself caught up in a centuries old battle with powers she has only barely begun to understand

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

3 Comments

Filed under writing

Rainbow Snippet for 12-15-2018

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Switching gears a bit to two of my favorite characters from the Academy of the Accord series. (Okay, yes, they’re all my favorites, but Yhon and Bry – especially Bry – hold a special place all their own.)

Yhonshel is a Tuanae, both wizard and warder. He is a captain, one of the three seconds in command at the garrison of the academy, and he is also a Master wizard and one of the three deputy headmasters at the academy. He’s quiet and gentle and soft-spoken but I truly don’t recommend ever making him truly angry.

Brythel is one of the cadets. He is timid and nervous and very unsure of himself. (One of the reasons I love Bry is that he probably grew and changed more than any other character I’ve ever written.)

The students were introduced to Yhonshel on their tour of the castle and he invited any of them who were interested in music to come find him during free time. Bry has taken him up on his offer.

The entrance hall was empty and he sighed with relief as he veered to the right, toward the library. Part of him wondered what he was doing: if Drehmus and Andrek caught him with what he carried… He pulled his mind away from that thought and clung to the memory of the tall blond and bearded wizard – Tuanae – and his offer to teach music to anyone who wanted to learn. The man’s voice still echoed in his mind, warm and soft, as were his eyes – eyes that seemed to understand parts of him that he didn’t even know existed – and his smile that held promises that Brythel couldn’t name, could dare dream of.

Nervously he climbed the stairs and emerged into a large empty room. He caught his breath as he looked around in awe at the instruments that hung on the walls and held down papers that cluttered every horizontal surface except the floor.

There was no one else in the room, however, and his hopes sank, tears of disappointment beginning to burn behind his eyes. It was all for nothing. He had risked being discovered – had risked his most precious possession – for nothing.

A slight movement caught his eye and he looked up. The Tuanae stood in the doorway of a second staircase.

 

 

 

 

 

6 Comments

Filed under writing