Tag Archives: fantasy

Sunday Snippet, December 10 2017

Returning to Song and Sword for a while, until I decide on something else to torture you with.

“What’s wrong?” Pashevel asked. They were walking side by side along a mountain road that led through a forest, sunlight filtering through freshly opened leaves, their unicorns ambling beside them. “You’ve been… tense and edgy for the past week or more.”

“We’re too close to Drow territory,” Marlia burst out. “The raids… Please, Pashevel…”

“Mar –” Pashevel’s response was cut off as the unicorns suddenly stopped and tossed their heads, fidgeting nervously.

“What is it, Sonata?” Pashevel reached for her horn but only got a sense of unease, that something was not right. He looked over at Marlia who seemed to be receiving a similar message. 

“It’s nothing that they are seeing or hearing,” she said. 

“Let’s mount up,” he said tersely, and she nodded.

They were barely in their saddles when both unicorns charged forward in a full gallop, racing along the road as if demons were about to leap from behind the trees and eat them alive. Neither animal slowed until they burst from the tree cover and into open air. They stopped and stood, trembling, still tense, as their riders surveyed their surroundings.  

 

 

 

Song and Sword cover

Blurb:
Pashevel: a simple Elven Bard — and the Crown Prince

Marlia: a Paladin of Arithen, the Elven God of Justice – seeking vengeance for the destruction of her village

Dakkas: heir to the Drow throne — if his father and elder half-brother don’t kill him first

Kashrya: raised among a tribe of nomadic Humans, she is unaware of her true heritage — or of the prophecy that made her mother an outcast

Their goal: build a bridge between the Elves and their outcast brethren, the Drow, reuniting them and undoing the damage caused in a time so far gone that history has become legend and legend has become myth.

But first, they have a problem to solve:  how do you stop a war that hasn’t started?

Available for Kindle at Amazon

and at Smashwords for everything else

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Sunday Snippet, November 26 2017

Thought I’d give you all a break from Song and Sword (I’ll probably come back to it in December) and spend the month posting excerpts from whatever I’ve written for NaNoWriMo the previous week.

I’m working on a prequel to the Academy of the Accord series. The tentative title is Creating Accord and it’s set a few generations before the series.

Boyin and Zin have met for the first time and Boyin has agreed to be Zin’s personal bodyguard. What neither one knows or understands is the bond that is forming between them already.

(In the series it is established that some warriors are “Warders” (I will find a better name for that) who have an instinct to protect wizards. And sometimes a Warder finds his wizard (or vice versa) and they form a special – and very deep – bond. Boyin, however is the first Warder, and he and Zin are the first bonded pair.)

“I will.” Boyin nodded and turned toward the door of the wagon, finding that he was reluctant to leave.  This wizard had been on his mind since the first time he saw him and now that he’d found him…

So, I’ve found him, now what? he asked himself, shaking his head. He’s just a wizard, someone I just met, just my employer…  He sighed. He wasn’t fooling himself and he wasn’t used to avoiding a problem.

And this wizard was a problem. He had a price on his head and as military… Ex-military, he reminded himself; he was no longer under any obligation to turn the man in, although he could no doubt earn back his commission if he did so.

He couldn’t do it. He knew what fate most likely awaited Zin if the military got their hands on him and he simply could not bear the thought of that happening.  He shook his head. He didn’t understand it, but he was a warrior, a soldier. He didn’t have to understand it, just accept the truth of it and act accordingly.

And part of acting accordingly was getting back to the wizard as soon as possible. For some reason he found it almost painful to be away from him.

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at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Sunday Snippet, November 19 2017

Thought I’d give you all a break from Song and Sword (I’ll probably come back to it in December) and spend the month posting excerpts from whatever I’ve written for NaNoWriMo the previous week.

I’m working on a prequel to the Academy of the Accord series. The tentative title is Creating Accord and it’s set a few generations before the series.

This snippet is the aftermath of a battle between wizards and soldiers. Aslir managed to get Zin away before the main fighting started and has gone back to check on the situation. He found a room full of dead wizards, with one bound to a chair in the center of the room.

“Panima,” he whispered softly, and her head came up.

“Where are you?”   

“Behind you. I’m invisible.”

“And Zin?”   

“Somewhere safe.”

“They’re looking for the two of you. Kraskir. Kraskir gave them your names, said you were the only two missing. He helped them. Helped them restrain me.” Her voice was flat, broken, with only a trace of bitterness.

“Yphier?”

“They killed him.” Tears filled the broken places in her voice. “He was the gentlest person I ever knew and he tried to stop the fighting and they killed him. He was a healer. He would have helped their injured if they’d asked but they killed him. And they left him here…”

Aslir followed her gaze to the body at her feet. Her brother’s dead face looked up at them and he knelt and closed his eyes. “I am so sorry,” he whispered.

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at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Sunday Snippet, November 12 2017

Thought I’d give you all a break from Song and Sword (I’ll probably come back to it in December) and spend the month posting excerpts from whatever I’ve written for NaNoWriMo the previous week.

I’m working on a prequel to the Academy of the Accord series. The tentative title is Creating Accord and it’s set a few generations before the series.

Zin isn’t the character’s full name but I don’t know it yet and [OLDEST SON] is because he doesn’t have any name yet. (Names are the bane of my existence. I think they are one step below blurb-writing on my most-hated list.)

I’m working on a prequel to the Academy of the Accord series. The tentative title is Creating Accord and it’s set a few generations before the series.

In this week’s snippet Zin has gone to the Fortress in response to a message from a friend. The morning after his arrival he attempts to go into town to the Messenger Station to send letters home. He runs into some trouble with a gate guard who won’t let him go, and the commander of the garrison – Boyin – intercedes and escorts him there and back. This conversation happens on their way back from the town.

 

Zin glanced at the commander. “So what is the real story on not being allowed to go into town to send my letters?”

“Orders from higher up. There’s been a change of command at the higher levels and they seem to think we’ve been too lax and easy going here. They’ve sent a bunch of new people, along with new orders relating to security.”

“But everyone in the tower is here of their own free will. They came here for protection.”

“I know. And we will protect them; that much hasn’t changed. It’s the way we go about it that they’re making changes to.”

“And you don’t like the changes?”

Boyin didn’t answer at first, frowning slightly as he weighed his answer. “I never had much to do with any of the wizards here, never even met any until you, but I never had anything against them either, and, like you said, they’ve all come here for protection because they don’t want any part of the wars.” He shook his head. “They came here for protection and the higher ups want to practically make prisoners out of them.”

Zin looked at him, startled. “Prisoners?”

“They’re not calling it that, of course, but I don’t know what else you could call it when they aren’t allowed to leave the grounds without an escort, and even that is being discouraged.”

“I have to leave,” Zin said. “I have to get home.”

“I’m not sure that’s going to be possible.”

 

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at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Gotta love NaNoWriMo

I’ve managed to stay above par all week, although not much above. (I was two words over it when I went to bed last night.)  Things are starting to pick up some now though (I’ve written over a thousand words so far this morning) so I’m hoping to get that much-need cushion built up before I go back to work.

(I have no idea when “back to work” is going to be now, as it’s looking like the kiddo might not be discharged tomorrow as planned, but I hope to have more information by the end of the day today, or at the latest some time tomorrow.)

It really helps to have accountability partners. There’s a thread in my local NaNo FB group for it, and another friend and I are posting excerpts from what we’ve written each day, even if it’s crap (which most of mine is).

Another help is to have a reward system. I’m pretty sure I’ve talked about being a jigsaw puzzle addict and that I can spend far too much time on JigZone. Well, the new rule is that I can’t do the puzzle of the day until I hit par. And I can’t do a second puzzle unless I’m at least one thousand words over par. (For every thousand words over par I get to do one extra puzzle.) (So far I haven’t done any extra puzzles.)

My current problem – if you could call it that – is that I really like this minor character that I’m working with now, and, unfortunately, he’ll soon be out of the story and he’s not in the series. I don’t have enough to give him a spin-off and I’m not sure I can use him elsewhere in a different guise.

Oh, and Zin, one of my main characters, still doesn’t have a full first name and his son still has no name at all and now there’s a possible character rebellion brewing further down the line involving Zin’s wife and his Warder.

*sigh*
Gotta love NaNoWriMo…

 

 

 

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Sunday Snippet, November 5 2017

Thought I’d give you all a break from Song and Sword (I’ll probably come back to it in December) and spend the month posting excerpts from whatever I’ve written for NaNoWriMo the previous week.

I’m working on a prequel to the Academy of the Accord series. The tentative title is Creating Accord and it’s set a few generations before the series.

Zin isn’t the character’s full name but I don’t know it yet and [OLDEST SON] is because he doesn’t have any name yet. (Names are the bane of my existence. I think they are one step below blurb-writing on my most-hated list.)

“Father? Are you all right? You got really quiet and you look sad.”

Zin smiled and ruffled his son’s hair. “I’m fine, [OLDEST SON]. Just thinking about something I have to do but don’t really want to.”

“But you’re a grown up.”

“Yes?”

“Grown ups don’t have to do things they don’t want to do.”

Zin shook his head and crouched down to be on a level with his son. “Sadly, [OLDEST SON], grown ups have to do a lot of things they don’t want to do. More than children, in fact.”

“Then what’s the point of being a grown up?”

(I have no idea how to answer that question, so if you have an answer feel free to share in the comments.)

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at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Sunday Snippet, October 29 2017

More from Song and Sword, the first novel I published, since I’m working on a sequel and need the motivation.  This follows immediately after last week’s snippet, which ended with:

The breeze grew stronger, bringing with it the scents of spring, and a faint light beckoned as well.  It grew brighter until he was almost sobbing with relief as he squeezed past a fallen boulder and found himself at the entrance to the outside world. 

The sky was burning with sunset as he stumbled out onto a boulder-strewn plateau.  Ahead of him a small rise promised a view of the world, and he headed toward it.

“Look, Kashrya,” he whispered.  “We’re free. It’s beautiful…”

She stirred in his arms, her eyes opening, staring up at him blankly. “Dakkas…”

“We made it, Kashrya! We’re out. We’re free.”  He dropped to his knees at the top of the rise, holding her so she could see the sky. “Look.”

She nestled against him. “Thank you, Dakkas.” Her voice was barely audible and the faintness of it pained him.  For a long moment they remained in silence, watching as the sky purpled.  “Dakkas? Sing to me. Sing me to sleep…”

“No!” he thought, but he could not deny her, and he sang, softly, choking on the words of the ancient lullaby.

 

Song and Sword cover

Blurb:
Pashevel: a simple Elven Bard — and the Crown Prince

Marlia: a Paladin of Arithen, the Elven God of Justice – seeking vengeance for the destruction of her village

Dakkas: heir to the Drow throne — if his father and elder half-brother don’t kill him first

Kashrya: raised among a tribe of nomadic Humans, she is unaware of her true heritage — or of the prophecy that made her mother an outcast

Their goal: build a bridge between the Elves and their outcast brethren, the Drow, reuniting them and undoing the damage caused in a time so far gone that history has become legend and legend has become myth.

But first, they have a problem to solve:  how do you stop a war that hasn’t started?

Available for Kindle at Amazon

and at Smashwords for everything else

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Sunday Snippet, October 22 2017

More from Song and Sword, the first novel I published, since I’m working on a sequel and need the motivation.  This follows immediately after last week’s snippet, which ended with:

As he drifted off he was awakened by what sounded like the loudest whip crack he had ever heard. His head snapped back and he was on his feet in an instant, fear lending him strength.  Heart racing, he looked around, seeing only blackness.  The ground trembled again, but in a different way, and he heard the sound of more rocks falling, this time from ahead of them.

Then all grew silent again, but something was different.  As he turned, he felt a trace of a breeze on his face, and drew in a deep breath.  Yes.  Somewhere, somewhere up there, up the passageway they’d been following, somewhere there was fresh air, an opening to the outside and he nearly laughed with joy as he pulled Kashrya to her feet and into his arms again and began walking toward it, hope propelling him as much as fear had done previously. 

“Soon,” he whispered to the unconscious woman in his arms. “Soon we will be out of here.”  Part of him wondered if it was true, or if they would get to the source of the air only to find an opening too small or too high up to get out of.  And part of him knew that she was going to die anyhow, in the cave or out: there was no hope for her – or for him.

But he went on.

 

 

 

 

Song and Sword cover

Blurb:
Pashevel: a simple Elven Bard — and the Crown Prince

Marlia: a Paladin of Arithen, the Elven God of Justice – seeking vengeance for the destruction of her village

Dakkas: heir to the Drow throne — if his father and elder half-brother don’t kill him first

Kashrya: raised among a tribe of nomadic Humans, she is unaware of her true heritage — or of the prophecy that made her mother an outcast

Their goal: build a bridge between the Elves and their outcast brethren, the Drow, reuniting them and undoing the damage caused in a time so far gone that history has become legend and legend has become myth.

But first, they have a problem to solve:  how do you stop a war that hasn’t started?

Available for Kindle at Amazon

and at Smashwords for everything else

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

5 Comments

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Sunday Snippet, October 15 2017

More from Song and Sword, the first novel I published, since I’m working on a sequel and need the motivation.  This follows immediately after last week’s snippet, which ended with:

He had no idea how long he had walked – it could have been minutes or hours or even days – nothing existed except pain, despair, and Kashrya.

He leaned against the wall of the tunnel, breathing hard, his legs shaking.  He slid to the floor, and his back, already a mass of welts and scars, scraped against the rough stone wall.  He moaned, his breath tightening in pain, and Kashrya roused slightly, reaching up to touch his cheek.

“Dakkas?”  Her voice was weak, but full of concern for him, and he felt a stab of something he couldn’t name as it occurred to him that he didn’t remember there ever being a time when anyone was concerned about him.

“I’m all right,” he said, his voice nothing more than a whisper.  He turned his head and kissed the inside of her wrist.  “I just need to rest for a moment…” 

His eyes closed, and he realized that it had been an eternity since he had had any real sleep, or food.  The Orcs had not wasted food on their prisoners, occasionally tossing some dried bread crusts to them, bread crusts that neither of them had the energy to eat.

Sleep. All he wanted was sleep.

 

 

 

 

Song and Sword cover

Blurb:
Pashevel: a simple Elven Bard — and the Crown Prince

Marlia: a Paladin of Arithen, the Elven God of Justice – seeking vengeance for the destruction of her village

Dakkas: heir to the Drow throne — if his father and elder half-brother don’t kill him first

Kashrya: raised among a tribe of nomadic Humans, she is unaware of her true heritage — or of the prophecy that made her mother an outcast

Their goal: build a bridge between the Elves and their outcast brethren, the Drow, reuniting them and undoing the damage caused in a time so far gone that history has become legend and legend has become myth.

But first, they have a problem to solve:  how do you stop a war that hasn’t started?

Available for Kindle at Amazon

and at Smashwords for everything else

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Sunday Snippet, October 8 2017

More from Song and Sword, the first novel I published, since I’m working on a sequel and need the motivation.  This follows immediately after last week’s snippet, which ended with:

“Dakkas. I can’t,” she sobbed.  “I can’t go any further…”  She dropped to her knees, shaking, her breath coming in ragged gasps.

Reaching for her in the darkness, he pulled her to her feet and scooped her into his arms. “I won’t leave you.”

She tried to protest, but he held her against him and with a soft sob she gave in, letting him carry her, both of them hoping that this would lead them somewhere safe – if there was such a place. 

The ground no longer trembled, but he was weak, and he knew that it would not be long before he, too, could not go any further.  But the only thing that truly mattered was that he had Kashrya, and that there was no sound of pursuit.  If they were going to die, they would die together, and free.

 

 

Song and Sword cover

Blurb:
Pashevel: a simple Elven Bard — and the Crown Prince

Marlia: a Paladin of Arithen, the Elven God of Justice – seeking vengeance for the destruction of her village

Dakkas: heir to the Drow throne — if his father and elder half-brother don’t kill him first

Kashrya: raised among a tribe of nomadic Humans, she is unaware of her true heritage — or of the prophecy that made her mother an outcast

Their goal: build a bridge between the Elves and their outcast brethren, the Drow, reuniting them and undoing the damage caused in a time so far gone that history has become legend and legend has become myth.

But first, they have a problem to solve:  how do you stop a war that hasn’t started?

Available for Kindle at Amazon

and at Smashwords for everything else

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

4 Comments

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