Tag Archives: excerpts

Rainbow Snippet for 1-25-2020

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Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from that “Steampunk Thing.” The first draft isn’t done yet and I’m hoping that this will keep me motivated to keep at it.

(Apologies for any language usage that’s anachronistic. I’ll deal with that once the first draft is done.)

This picks up from last week, with Danny being introduced to his employer’s bodyguards.

The English mastiff rose and approached me, his great head nearly level with my chest and for a moment I had an uneasy vision of him ripping my heart out. Instead, he pressed his nose against me and took a deep breath, getting to know my scent.

“They won’t hurt you.” Her voice was tinged with amusement. “If they’d thought you were a threat you wouldn’t be standing here now.”

Moderately reassured I cautiously reached out and scratched behind his ears and was rewarded with slobbery tongue against my face.

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday Snippet, January 19, 2020

More from the untitled WiP that I’ve been posting from.

This follows from last week’s snippet.

“What’s it like?”

“What’s what like?”

 “The Wilds. We hear tales, but I don’t think I believe most of them.”

“What sort of tales?” She was curious about what the city dwellers knew about the Wilds.

He shrugged, embarrassed. “They say that there are all sorts of wild animals out there that are dangerous killers and will rip a man to pieces, even an armed man. And poisonous plants. And that even the water is poisonous.”

Kestra smiled. “There are wild animals, but most are afraid of people. Attacks are rare, and usually caused by something the person did. As for plants, there are some that will make your skin blister and itch if you touch them, and some that will make you ill if you eat their fruit. There are a few – very few – that are deadly. And as for water, we hear the same things about the water in the city. Some of it isn’t safe to drink, but mostly it just makes you sick and won’t kill you, although you may wish you were dead until it gets out of your system.

 

I thought maybe I should post a bit of an explanation/blurb in progress for you to give you some sort of idea about the world I’m playing in for this:

Magic had reasserted itself. Banished for millennia, it could no longer be contained and erupted, bursting forth with a surge of power that had never been known before, and which, mercifully, has not been repeated since.

Unfortunately, no one believed in magic anymore, so no one knew what to do with it, not even those most directly affected: not those who had mutated overnight into creatures of legend, not those born as something other than human, not those who retained human but found themselves touched in other ways, with special powers and abilities.

Almost no one.

There were a few. A few who had held on to dreams and understandings, who believed in the things that others called fantasy. These few took roles as adepts, as teachers and counselors, leading the way into the new age.

There were some, of course, who rejected the changes. They persecuted the Abominations, as they called them, they drove them out of the cities and into the wilds.

And, gradually, a balance was achieved.

Sort of.

Outside the cities, in the wilds, there arose villages, their inhabitants, human and non, living together in peace and harmony with each other and with the natural world that was feared by the city dwellers.

In the cities, Tech ruled. But magic, or, rather, magic power, was not forgotten, nor entirely abandoned, and Temples grew, their priests (who had no power of their own) seeking Power, seeking to harness it for their own ends.

But also in the cities, magic remained.

Humans were still born with special abilities, special senses. They learned not to talk about them, not to reveal that they were “different” – if they did, they were ostracized, driven out away from the general population. 

Veren was one such human.

Mutants were still born each year, but in smaller numbers than during the Awakening. Some infants were killed by their parents, and some were hidden away for a few years, abandoned when their differences could no longer be hidden. 

Jopie was one such child.

And in the wilds, humans and mutants continued to live in harmony, and to practice magic. But occasionally one would be born with a wild talent, something strong and different than what was normal for their village. They felt isolated, because there was no one to help them understand their gift. Some were driven mad by the visions they saw, others went in search of help when the visions became too much to handle.

Kestra was one such person.

 (Yeah, I know it’s too long. But the book is a long way from being finished so I have lots of time to work on it.)

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Rainbow Snippet for 1-18-2020

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Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from that “Steampunk Thing.” The first draft isn’t done yet and I’m hoping that this will keep me motivated to keep at it.

(Apologies for any language usage that’s anachronistic. I’ll deal with that once the first draft is done.)

This picks up from last week.

“…Aren’t you worried about working here all alone?”

“Who said I was alone?” Humor danced in her eyes. “Boys,” she called softly, and a moment later two large dogs appeared in the doorway to the warehouse. “Come meet Mr. McKelvy, boys,” she said, rising.

I scrambled to my feet as well – it wouldn’t do for a gentleman – or any man with any manners – to remain seated whilst a lady stood – never taking my eyes from the dogs. One was an English mastiff; his dark brindle coat would have made him difficult to notice in the shadowed corner of the warehouse even if my attention hadn’t been drawn to the airship. The other was an Irish wolfhound, so dark grey as to be nearly black.

They approached calmly and sat at a hand signal from their owner. “Roger, come say hello.”

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday Snippet, January 12, 2020

More from the untitled WiP that I’ve been posting from.

Anyhow…

This follows from last week’s snippet.

She looked up when he [Veren] opened the door and stepped back into the kitchen and he smiled, taking his first good look at her: large dark eyes, brown hair escaping from her braid to frame her face, a slight figure, almost fragile looking. “Gundrin will be joining us shortly. He’s very eager to talk to you.”

“I didn’t think that I was that exciting.” She seemed a bit uneasy and he wondered if anyone else had come in while he was gone.

“We don’t get many visitors here, especially not from the Wilds.” He crossed the room and sat down across from her. “What’s it like?”

“What’s what like?”

“The Wilds. We hear tales, but I don’t think I believe most of them.”

“What sort of tales?” She was curious about what the city dwellers knew about the Wilds.

 

I thought maybe I should post a bit of an explanation/blurb in progress for you to give you some sort of idea about the world I’m playing in for this:

Magic had reasserted itself. Banished for millennia, it could no longer be contained and erupted, bursting forth with a surge of power that had never been known before, and which, mercifully, has not been repeated since.

Unfortunately, no one believed in magic anymore, so no one knew what to do with it, not even those most directly affected: not those who had mutated overnight into creatures of legend, not those born as something other than human, not those who retained human but found themselves touched in other ways, with special powers and abilities.

Almost no one.

There were a few. A few who had held on to dreams and understandings, who believed in the things that others called fantasy. These few took roles as adepts, as teachers and counselors, leading the way into the new age.

There were some, of course, who rejected the changes. They persecuted the Abominations, as they called them, they drove them out of the cities and into the wilds.

And, gradually, a balance was achieved.

Sort of.

Outside the cities, in the wilds, there arose villages, their inhabitants, human and non, living together in peace and harmony with each other and with the natural world that was feared by the city dwellers.

In the cities, Tech ruled. But magic, or, rather, magic power, was not forgotten, nor entirely abandoned, and Temples grew, their priests (who had no power of their own) seeking Power, seeking to harness it for their own ends.

But also in the cities, magic remained.

Humans were still born with special abilities, special senses. They learned not to talk about them, not to reveal that they were “different” – if they did, they were ostracized, driven out away from the general population. 

Veren was one such human.

Mutants were still born each year, but in smaller numbers than during the Awakening. Some infants were killed by their parents, and some were hidden away for a few years, abandoned when their differences could no longer be hidden. 

Jopie was one such child.

And in the wilds, humans and mutants continued to live in harmony, and to practice magic. But occasionally one would be born with a wild talent, something strong and different than what was normal for their village. They felt isolated, because there was no one to help them understand their gift. Some were driven mad by the visions they saw, others went in search of help when the visions became too much to handle.

Kestra was one such person.

 (Yeah, I know it’s too long. But the book is a long way from being finished so I have lots of time to work on it.)

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Rainbow Snippet for 1-11-2020

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Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from that “Steampunk Thing.” The first draft isn’t done yet and I’m hoping that this will keep me motivated to keep at it.

(Apologies for any language usage that’s anachronistic. I’ll deal with that once the first draft is done.)

This picks up from last week.

“Are you free to start tomorrow morning?”

“Yes, Ma’am. Just tell me what time you want me to be here.”

“I’m not a stickler for time, Mr. McKelvy, just for quality. I’m usually here so come in any time and just call out and I’ll show you what needs to be done. I’ll get you a key to the office and once you know what to work on, just come in and start.”

I frowned slightly and she cocked her head. “Is something wrong?”

“No, ma’am, just…” I took a deep breath, wondering how it was that I felt so protective of her, having just met her and all. “The docks aren’t necessarily the safest place for a woman, especially after dark. Aren’t you worried about working here all alone?”

 

 

 

 

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Sunday Snippet, January 5, 2020

The good news is I found a cable for my external hard drive. (Or, rather, a friend of mine did. I told him what I needed and asked what to use as a search term to find it; he had me take a picture of the port on the hard drive and told me what it was. Before I could type “You’re awesome!” he’d sent me the link to it on Amazon.

The bad news is that there was nothing of note on there at all so I’m back to square one (or maybe zero) regarding the rest of what I have written. But I’ll keep looking. I know it’s somewhere!

Anyhow…

This follows from last week’s snippet.

“Please, can you help her?”

Gundrin nodded. “Go back to her and stay with her. I will join you in a few minutes.” Veren hesitated and he smiled. “It will be all right. For both of you.”

Veren let out a breath he hadn’t realized he was holding. “Thank you.” He turned and made his way back to the kitchen, relieved. And scared by what he was doing. If they found out it meant death, or worse.

For all of them

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Rainbow Snippet for 1-4-2020

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Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from that “Steampunk Thing.” The first draft isn’t done yet and I’m hoping that this will keep me motivated to keep at it.

(Apologies for any language usage that’s anachronistic. I’ll deal with that once the first draft is done.)

This picks up from last week.

“Might I borrow your pen, Mrs. Madison?”

“Miss,” she corrected, handing it to me.

I nodded as I took it, not quite sure what to make of this information. She was certainly of marrying age – about twenty three, I’d guess – and more than pretty enough. And her bearing and speech gave her away as being of high class. I supposed she had suitors enough that there might be some difficulty deciding between them. Or maybe the big blue airship in the next room consumed all her time.

But that wasn’t something for me to worry about. My only concern was the job I was being hired for, so I signed my full name – Daniel Matthew McKelvy – and handed the pen and paper back to her.

“Are you free to start tomorrow morning?”

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday Snippet, December 29, 2019

Looks like I’ll be posting from this for a while yet, maybe even long enough to find a cable for my external hard drive, or the hand written part of the story that I know I’ve seen somewhere.

This follows from last week’s snippet.

“Would you like to start from the beginning?” his host asked. “Perhaps with a cup of tea?”

Veren shook his head. “There’s no time.” Fear gripped him as he said it. He shouldn’t have left her alone. What if one of them…

“What is it, my son?”

Veren swallowed the lump in his throat. “Someone came into the courtyard. A woman from the Wilds. She’s answering a Call. I think it’s probably from the one they’ve been looking for. I know I should tell them, but I can’t… I can’t turn her over to them.” 

“Where is she now?”

“I left her in the kitchen with a bowl of stew.” Brown eyes pleaded with the man in front of him. “Please, can you help her?”

 

 

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Rainbow Snippet for 12-28-2019

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Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from that “Steampunk Thing.” The first draft isn’t done yet and I’m hoping that this will keep me motivated to keep at it.

(Apologies for any language usage that’s anachronistic. I’ll deal with that once the first draft is done.)

This picks up from last week.

She chuckled. “You’ll be up close and personal with them soon enough, and may well wish you’d never heard of them by the time we’re through.”

She slid the paper across the desk to me. “Employment contract. Take some time to look over it and if there’s anything you’d like to discuss or change, feel free to ask me about it.”

I glanced at the paper, not quite sure what to do or say. I’d never had a job that was much more than day work, certainly not anything long term enough to require a contract, and all I could do was hope to not make myself look a fool. The pay rate was spelled out at the top of the paper, and I relaxed a bit; at least I knew what that was. But below it was a confidentiality notice and I paused to read it; never having seen one before I had no way of knowing if it was something normal or not, but it seemed pretty straightforward. Basically I was not to talk about any of the things I saw or worked on with the airship. That made sense, I supposed; I’d done enough reading about them to know that inventors could be quite secretive about their creations. At the bottom were two lines. She’d already signed on one of them.

“Might I borrow your pen, Mrs. Madison?”

 

 

 

 

 

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Sunday Snippet, December 22, 2019

Looks like I’ll be posting from this for a while yet, maybe even long enough to find a cable for my external hard drive, or the hand written part of the story that I know I’ve seen somewhere.

This follows from last week’s snippet, which ended with Veren knocking on a door.

Light spilled into the hallway and the small wizened man looked up at him. “Yes?” His eyes and voice were gentle and wise, and Veren suddenly knew that he was doing the right thing.

“I need to talk to you,” he said, his voice barely a whisper. “May I come in?”

The Gnome said nothing, merely opened the door wider and beckoned him to enter.

Veren stepped inside the room, taking a deep breath. Gundrin had treated him with nothing but kindness since he had arrived here with the Priests, the first person who had ever done so. He hoped he wasn’t reading him wrong and that he would be able to help him – help her. “I’ve never done this before,” he said. “But I can’t… I just can’t do what I know I should.”

“Would you like to start from the beginning?” his host asked. “Perhaps with a cup of tea?”

 

 

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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