Category Archives: writing

Wednesday Words #347 (8/18/2021)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

This week’s prompt:

a new job
an old song
a current dilemma

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

 

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Wednesday Words #346 (8/11/2021)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

This week’s prompt:

an old man in a park
rain
a food vendor

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

 

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Wednesday Words #345 (8/4/2021)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

This week’s prompt:

a bonfire
a hobby
a crash

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

 

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Sunday Snippet, August 1, 2021

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Finishing up introducing the adult Hierik in Song and Sword, and skipping ahead to after Marlia’s trial.

Hierik cleared his throat. “Would the four of you please join me in my chambers?  I have something I need to discuss with you.”

The four exchanged glances, and Pashevel shrugged. He had no more idea than they did. “A moment,” he said quietly, giving Hierik a half-bow.

Hierik raised an eyebrow as Pashevel crossed the room to talk to Mathin; there were not many who would walk away when he asked them to come speak with him.

They watched as the two spoke, and shook hands, Pashevel putting his free hand on the Mathin’s upper arm in a gesture of friendship. Pashevel bowed, and returned to the group, smiling. “Now, Hierik, I believe you said something about a bottle of wine?”

“I said no such thing, Impudence,” Hierik chuckled, giving Pashevel a slap on the back of the head. “Come along.”

Once settled in the judge’s chambers, however, Hierik produced a bottle of wine and a set of goblets. As he poured the wine, Pashevel turned to Marlia. “What did he ask you?”

Marlia flushed again. “He asked me if I loved you.”

Pashevel raised an eyebrow as Hierik handed him a goblet of wine. Hierik shrugged. “I just wanted to make sure,” he said. “I know you too well, Pashevel.  You tend to be far too trusting.”

“You think I can’t tell the difference between real feelings and someone who is toying with emotions?”

Hierik studied him for a moment then shook his head. “No. It’s not that exactly. But face it, my friend, you have never had trouble attracting the ladies.”

“Oh?” Now it was Marlia’s turn to raise an eyebrow.

Hierik chuckled. “Oh, not deliberately, my lady. He’s never been one to take advantage, but, well, I’m sure you’ve seen how people react to him.”

Marlia nodded and relaxed against Pashevel as she accepted the goblet that Hierik handed her. “Pash does have a way with people. They are drawn to him.”

“All part of being a Bard,” Pashevel replied, taking a sip of wine. “Excellent vintage. Your own vineyard’s?” 

“Of course.”

Dakkas watched the exchange, trying to connect this friendly easy-going man with the one who had entered Marlia’s cell.

“Something wrong, Dak?” Pashevel asked.

Dakkas shook his head. “No. Just…”  He looked at Hierik then back at Pashevel.

“He seems so different than the man who came to Marlia’s cell,” Kashrya said. “It’s like they are two different people.”

Hierik laughed. “You can blame Pashevel for that. He gave me the reputation for being a monster.”

Pashevel shrugged. “Because you’re about as frightening as a blade of grass.”    

Hierik sighed. “True enough.” He looked at the others. “Until I met Pashevel, no one took me seriously.” He smiled at the memory. “Then this Bard showed up, and not only listened to me and took me seriously, he created a persona and reputation for me that ensured that others would also.” He shook his head, chuckling. “Of course, now everyone is scared of me, but at least they listen when I speak.” 

(“Because you’re about as frightening as a blade of grass.” is the line that led me to write Song and Shadow – I just had to know more about the young Hierik and how and Pashevel met.)

 

 

Pashevel: a simple Elven Bard — and the Crown Prince

Marlia: a Paladin of Arithen, the Elven God of Justice – seeking vengeance for the destruction of her village

Dakkas: heir to the Drow throne — if his father and elder half-brother don’t kill him first

Kashrya: raised among a tribe of nomadic Humans, she is unaware of her true heritage — or of the prophecy that made her mother an outcast

Their goal: build a bridge between the Elves and their outcast brethren, the Drow, reuniting them and undoing the damage caused in a time so far gone that history has become legend and legend has become myth.

But first, they have a problem to solve:  how do you stop a war that hasn’t started?

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

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Rainbow Snippet for 7-31-2021

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).  Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

More from Onyx Sun. The good news is that I finally finished entering the changes I made on paper. The bad news is that there are still giant loose ends to tie up. But I’m getting there. Slowly.

Picking up from last week.

“I thought it was too… personal. Some people – and some races – have taboos about discussing sex.”

“I do not. Nor is there anything in Araxian culture that makes it awkward. And you were merely curious. Questions are how we learn about one another.”

“True. I just don’t want to give offense. Different cultures can be tricky until you learn to understand them.”

“And you will not understand them if you do not ask questions.” Ayess thought for a moment. “My people do not seem to take offense easily, not as easily as some races.”

“Good to know,” she said. “If I do cross a line, or come close, let me know and I’ll back off.”

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday Words #344 (7/28/2021)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

This week’s prompt:

an art display
a harvest festival
a sudden storm

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

 

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Sunday Snippet, July 25, 2021

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Since it’s July Camp NaNoWriMo and I’ll be working on Song and Shadow, I thought I’d kind of step back from posting from it for a bit and instead show you what led to writing it by introducing the adult Hierik in Song and Sword.

Skipping a few paragraphs from last week. Hierik’s interrogation was interrupted by a message that there was someone waiting for him in his chambers with an urgent message.

“Order!” Hierik’s voice brought her back to the present and her fear returned. “The accused will rise,” he said, and Marlia stood up, shaking slightly. “You are accused of the murders of Bendren and Liffea. How do you plead?”

“Not guilty,” she said, her voice suddenly strong and confident as she looked past Hierik to Pashevel.

“Yet you stand accused by an eyewitness, the son of your victims.”

“I did not kill them.”

“Then explain how their son has identified you as their killer.”

“The man who accused me is not the man who they introduced me to as their son.”

There were murmurs from the crowd at this but Hierik pushed on. “Maybe they had more than one. Maybe you are lying.”

The crowd’s murmurs grew angry and Hierik turned to them. “Quiet!” he thundered, but one man stood up, facing him.

“They had no children,” he said clearly as people turned to look at him. “Neither do I, but I have a ‘son’ just like theirs.” Pashevel recognized him as the man who had stopped at the burned out farmhouse to speak with them. 

“Sit down!” Hierik roared, but the man stood firm.

“No,” he replied calmly. “I will be heard. My name is Yannik,” he went on, “and I am tired of being forced to live a lie.”

A murmur of agreement swept through the crowd.

“No one should have to live a lie,” Hierik agreed, his voice quiet as he turned the focus of his gaze from Yannik to the entire crowd, smiling as his eyes swept over them. “I have been informed of what is going on here, and I want you to know that the Crown is also aware, or will be soon.”

He turned back to Marlia. “Tell me what happened, Paladin.”

A bit further along in the trial, Marlia is being questioned as she is holding the Shield of Truth.

“Have you ever killed anyone?” Hierik asked.

The question startled her, but she answered calmly. “Yes.”

“Have you ever killed anyone other than in defense of yourself or others?”

“No.”

Hierik smiled and leaned in close to her, whispering a question in her ear. Marlia flushed and looked away, then looked at her friends. They looked puzzled – even Pashevel – and she realized that this had not been part of the plan. She smiled and looked at Hierik. “Yes.”

Hierik laughed. “Just wanted to make sure,” he said, turning back to the crowd.

“I declare Marlia, Paladin of Arithen, to be not guilty of the charges laid against her.  Are there any here who would dispute the findings?”

 

 

Pashevel: a simple Elven Bard — and the Crown Prince

Marlia: a Paladin of Arithen, the Elven God of Justice – seeking vengeance for the destruction of her village

Dakkas: heir to the Drow throne — if his father and elder half-brother don’t kill him first

Kashrya: raised among a tribe of nomadic Humans, she is unaware of her true heritage — or of the prophecy that made her mother an outcast

Their goal: build a bridge between the Elves and their outcast brethren, the Drow, reuniting them and undoing the damage caused in a time so far gone that history has become legend and legend has become myth.

But first, they have a problem to solve:  how do you stop a war that hasn’t started?

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

Leave a comment

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Rainbow Snippet for 7-24-2021

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).  Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

More from Onyx Sun. The good news is that I finally finished entering the changes I made on paper. The bad news is that there are still giant loose ends to tie up. But I’m getting there. Slowly.

Picking up from last week.

“Do you have anyone you want or need to contact, friends or family or anyone, to let them know that you are alive and well and free?”

“I have no family. Not in a sense that you would understand, with a mother and father. When Denni called me an ‘it’ and said that Araxians do not have sexes he was semi-correct. We do not have male and female.”

“Then, how…”  She stopped. She wanted to ask how they procreated but that seemed to be too personal and she flushed.

“We do not have males and females because we are all both.”

“Hermaphrodites?”

“I believe that is your word for it. We don’t have one because it just is.” Ayess smiled. “It is said that when Araxians first met humans we thought that males and females were two different races.”

“We must be as confusing to you as you are to us.” She smiled. “Thank you for answering the question that I didn’t ask.”

“Why didn’t you ask?”

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday Words #343 (7/21/2021)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

This week’s prompt:

a pig roast
a motorcycle
a shooting star

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

 

1 Comment

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Sunday Snippet, July 18, 2021

.

Since it’s July Camp NaNoWriMo and I’ll be working on Song and Shadow, I thought I’d kind of step back from posting from it for a bit and instead show you what led to writing it by introducing the adult Hierik in Song and Sword.

Skipping a few paragraphs from last week. Hierik’s interrogation was interrupted by a message that there was someone waiting for him in his chambers with an urgent message.

Pashevel lounged comfortably in a chair, waiting. He was slightly worried; he knew Hierik’s reputation, and his methods of interrogation. And he knew Dakkas’ temper, and silently prayed that his friend would stay calm, and that Hierik would respond to the jailer’s request for him to come to his quarters.

The door opened and the tall man entered, slamming it closed behind him. “What is the meaning of this?” he demanded. “You can’t just walk into a Judge’s chambers and…”  He broke off as the man got to his feet, laughing.

“Ah, Hierik. You haven’t changed.” 

“I know that laugh… Pashevel?”

Pashevel bowed. “How are you?”

“I am well, Prince. And yourself? What brings you to this place?”

“Please, no ‘Prince.’ Just Pashevel. We’re not in any kind of Court right now.”

“And it’s safer not to be royalty,” Hierik agreed. “I understand. So, what brings you here?”

Pashevel took a deep breath and sat down again. “How much do you know of what’s been going on?”

Pashevel: a simple Elven Bard — and the Crown Prince

Marlia: a Paladin of Arithen, the Elven God of Justice – seeking vengeance for the destruction of her village

Dakkas: heir to the Drow throne — if his father and elder half-brother don’t kill him first

Kashrya: raised among a tribe of nomadic Humans, she is unaware of her true heritage — or of the prophecy that made her mother an outcast

Their goal: build a bridge between the Elves and their outcast brethren, the Drow, reuniting them and undoing the damage caused in a time so far gone that history has become legend and legend has become myth.

But first, they have a problem to solve:  how do you stop a war that hasn’t started?

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under writing