Category Archives: writing

Sunday Snippet, December 16, 2018

Picking up from last week in Hedge House, a paranormal/urban fantasy WiP.  Cara is getting to know Tamira, the woman who runs the shop her grandmother owned.

“Only if it makes you more aware of how your actions create ripples.”

“It wasn’t her actions, Tamira,” Jacob said, a low warning growl in his voice. “Put the blame where it’s due. Her absence was her mother’s doing. She’s the one that took her away from everything that she knew and got her exposed to that crazy cult.” He looked at Cara. “Apologies,” he said. “But that’s what it is.”

“You won’t get any argument from me about that,” Cara said. “I happen to agree with you. The things they did…” Her mind shied away from the events even as part of her knew with a deep certainty that Jacob did know… But how could he?

She shook her head sharply to clear the thought and pushed it down. Now was not the time to lose her mind or to explore random feelings and questions and knowings.

She smiled at Tamira. “Tell me about the shop?” she asked. “I don’t seem to remember it from when I was little.”

“Belle didn’t open it until after you’d been taken away,” the woman replied. “She started it because…” Tamira caught Jacob’s gaze and something seemed to flow between them. “Because she needed something to occupy her time after losing her son and granddaughter.”

Cara fixed her with an intense gaze, wondering what she had been going to say, but Jacob touched her shoulder and she turned to look at him.

“Not yet, Cara,” he murmured. “You’re not ready to know that yet.”

 

Tentative Blurb:

When Cara Hawthorne returns to the childhood home she had been torn away from twenty years earlier, she thinks it will be to do nothing more than settle her grandmother’s estate and return to her job as a junior lawyer at a prestigious law firm in Tulsa.

But every nook and cranny of the house and gardens unearths long-buried memories, and when the town’s mayor sets his sights on her and the property she finds herself caught up in a centuries old battle with powers she has only barely begun to understand

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Rainbow Snippet for 12-15-2018

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Switching gears a bit to two of my favorite characters from the Academy of the Accord series. (Okay, yes, they’re all my favorites, but Yhon and Bry – especially Bry – hold a special place all their own.)

Yhonshel is a Tuanae, both wizard and warder. He is a captain, one of the three seconds in command at the garrison of the academy, and he is also a Master wizard and one of the three deputy headmasters at the academy. He’s quiet and gentle and soft-spoken but I truly don’t recommend ever making him truly angry.

Brythel is one of the cadets. He is timid and nervous and very unsure of himself. (One of the reasons I love Bry is that he probably grew and changed more than any other character I’ve ever written.)

The students were introduced to Yhonshel on their tour of the castle and he invited any of them who were interested in music to come find him during free time. Bry has taken him up on his offer.

The entrance hall was empty and he sighed with relief as he veered to the right, toward the library. Part of him wondered what he was doing: if Drehmus and Andrek caught him with what he carried… He pulled his mind away from that thought and clung to the memory of the tall blond and bearded wizard – Tuanae – and his offer to teach music to anyone who wanted to learn. The man’s voice still echoed in his mind, warm and soft, as were his eyes – eyes that seemed to understand parts of him that he didn’t even know existed – and his smile that held promises that Brythel couldn’t name, could dare dream of.

Nervously he climbed the stairs and emerged into a large empty room. He caught his breath as he looked around in awe at the instruments that hung on the walls and held down papers that cluttered every horizontal surface except the floor.

There was no one else in the room, however, and his hopes sank, tears of disappointment beginning to burn behind his eyes. It was all for nothing. He had risked being discovered – had risked his most precious possession – for nothing.

A slight movement caught his eye and he looked up. The Tuanae stood in the doorway of a second staircase.

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday Words #207 (12/12/2018)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

This week’s prompt:

a clock
a torn curtain
stationery

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

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Sunday Snippet, December 9, 2018

Still posting from Hedge House, a paranormal/urban fantasy WiP. Cara is making her first visit to the shop her grandmother owned and left to her.

 

The chimes of the opening door hadn’t even died away before a woman emerged from the back. She was short, with a thin frame and chestnut-red hair pulled back in a bun, and Cara couldn’t even make a guess at her age – she seemed to be older than Jacob but younger than she was. She was, however, fairly certain that she didn’t remember her – or the shop – from her childhood.  But the most disconcerting thing was that somehow Cara found it difficult to look directly at her.

“Tamira,” Jacob said. “I want you to meet Cara, Belle’s granddaughter.”

“It’s nice to meet you.” There was a lyrical quality to Tamira’s voice, almost hypnotic. “Belle was so looking forward to your visit.”

“I know.” Cara bowed her head, forcing down a wave of regret. “I wish I would have contacted her sooner, would have come home sooner.”

“All things happen when they’re supposed to,” Tamira said. “And we are always where we need to be when we need to be there. Regret doesn’t change the past.”

“Does it do anything to the present or the future?”

“Only if it makes you more aware of how your actions create ripples.”

 

Tentative Blurb:

When Cara Hawthorne returns to the childhood home she had been torn away from twenty years earlier, she thinks it will be to do nothing more than settle her grandmother’s estate and return to her job as a junior lawyer at a prestigious law firm in Tulsa.

But every nook and cranny of the house and gardens unearths long-buried memories, and when the town’s mayor sets his sights on her and the property she finds herself caught up in a centuries old battle with powers she has only barely begun to understand

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Rainbow Snippet for 12-8-2018

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Picking up from last week’s snippet from Book 5.5 of the Academy of the Accord series.

“Do you know what you just signed?” Wellhym asked, holding the boy’s gaze.

“A contract.”

“But you have no idea what it says?”

“N-no, sir.” Drehmus was suddenly suspecting a trap as the Captains smiled.

“So, for all you know, you’ve just agreed to shine boots for everyone in the garrison during your free time from now until you graduate.”

There was some laughter as Drehmus flushed. Wellhym chuckled as he folded the paper and tucked it inside his shirt as he stood up.

“And that,” Kordelm said, “is why warriors should know how to read and write. And do basic arithmetic,” he added. “Otherwise, how will you know if your pay is correct, or if you get the proper amount of coin returned when you buy something?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday Words #206 (12/5/2018)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

This week’s prompt:

a war
a holiday
a pot of soup

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

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Sunday Snippet, December 2, 2018

Picking up from last week’s snippet of Hedge House. Jacob has taken Cara into town to show her the shop her grandmother had, and to introduce her to Tamira, the woman who runs it.

Her nerves returned as he pulled into the parking lot of a small building and parked off to the side. The storm door stood open, taking advantage of the fresh air and Cara looked at the building curiously.

“You know, I never did ask what kind of business this is.”

“Antique shop. Curiosities and oddities. Mostly.” he added. 

“Mostly?”

But he was getting out of the truck and she followed, her curiosity roused. “What do you mean by mostly?”

He gave her a wink. “You’ll find out soon enough.”

“It’s nothing illegal, is it?” she asked suspiciously, and he burst into laughter.

“Not in this day and age, although there was a time…”

She looked at him curiously, but he was holding the screen door open and motioning her into the store.   

 

Tentative Blurb:

When Cara Hawthorne returns to the childhood home she had been torn away from twenty years earlier, she thinks it will be to do nothing more than settle her grandmother’s estate and return to her job as a junior lawyer at a prestigious law firm in Tulsa.

But every nook and cranny of the house and gardens unearths long-buried memories, and when the town’s mayor sets his sights on her and the property she finds herself caught up in a centuries old battle with powers she has only barely begun to understand

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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Rainbow Snippet for 12-1-2018

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Following from last week’s snippet.

“Do you know how to write your name, or at least make your mark?” Wellhym asked as he wrote, pausing to look up at Drehmus.

“Of course I do.”

Wellhym nodded and went back to writing.  Kordelm, curious, leaned over his shoulder and barely suppressed a grin.

“All right,” Wellhym said as he looked up. “Come here, Drehmus.”

The boy swaggered up to the desk as Wellhym turned the paper to face him and slid it across the desk toward him.

“This is pretty close to the standard wording you’ll find in a contract – the sort you would sign to act as a warder for a wizard, or to join a city guard or even a private patrol. The military probably has something similar as well.” He handed Drehmus the quill and pointed to a line he had drawn. “That’s where you make your mark or sign your name.”

He waited, his silence a challenge, and Drehmus took the quill and laboriously wrote his name, then handed it back to him. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday Words #205 (11/28/2018)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

This week’s prompt:

a mouse
decorations
an old woman

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

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Sunday Snippet, November 25, 2018

Skipping ahead a bit in Hedge House. It’s the next day and Jacob has decided that Cara needs to get out for a bit. He speaks first.

“Why don’t we get out for a bit after lunch? I’ll take you to the shop and introduce you to Tamira. I know she’d like to meet you.”

Cara winced. “I’m so sorry. I should have gone before now…”

Jacob shook his head. “You’re only one person, Cara. You haven’t learned how to be in two places at once yet.”

After lunch she climbed into the passenger seat of Jacob’s old battered blue Dodge pickup. It smelled like earth and engine grease with a trace of manure, and she smiled as she buckled her seatbelt.

“What’s so funny?” he asked as the engine growled to life.

She shook her head. “I remember riding in a truck with you and my father to go get ice cream. I think it was red, but it smelled just like this one.”

Jacob smiled. “They say that the sense of smell the most primitive and is tied directly into the memory section of the brain.” 

“True.”

“And when we’re done at the shop we’ll go get ice cream.”

She laughed and leaned back into the seat as he pulled out onto the road, feeling oddly content and comforted.

 

Tentative Blurb:

When Cara Hawthorne returns to the childhood home she had been torn away from twenty years earlier, she thinks it will be to do nothing more than settle her grandmother’s estate and return to her job as a junior lawyer at a prestigious law firm in Tulsa.

But every nook and cranny of the house and gardens unearths long-buried memories, and when the town’s mayor sets his sights on her and the property she finds herself caught up in a centuries old battle with powers she has only barely begun to understand

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

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