Monthly Archives: February 2020

Sunday Snippet, February 23, 2020

More from the untitled WiP that I’ve been posting from.

This follows from last week’s snippet.

Kestra’s gaze shifted to take in the new speaker. He was a Gnome, and a rather ancient one. Black eyes shone kindly out from a leathery skin, yellowed with age, or perhaps it was his natural coloring.

“I’m Gundrin,” he introduced himself.

“Kestra,” she replied, accepting his proffered hand. “I’m pleased to meet you.”

“The pleasure is mine,” he replied. He nodded toward the guard. “Veren tells me you’re here because of a Call?”

She nodded. “It’s been pulling at me,” she said. “I didn’t know what it was at first.”

 

I thought maybe I should post a bit of an explanation/blurb in progress for you to give you some sort of idea about the world I’m playing in for this:

Magic had reasserted itself. Banished for millennia, it could no longer be contained and erupted, bursting forth with a surge of power that had never been known before, and which, mercifully, has not been repeated since.

Unfortunately, no one believed in magic anymore, so no one knew what to do with it, not even those most directly affected: not those who had mutated overnight into creatures of legend, not those born as something other than human, not those who retained human but found themselves touched in other ways, with special powers and abilities.

Almost no one.

There were a few. A few who had held on to dreams and understandings, who believed in the things that others called fantasy. These few took roles as adepts, as teachers and counselors, leading the way into the new age.

There were some, of course, who rejected the changes. They persecuted the Abominations, as they called them, they drove them out of the cities and into the wilds.

And, gradually, a balance was achieved.

Sort of.

Outside the cities, in the wilds, there arose villages, their inhabitants, human and non, living together in peace and harmony with each other and with the natural world that was feared by the city dwellers.

In the cities, Tech ruled. But magic, or, rather, magic power, was not forgotten, nor entirely abandoned, and Temples grew, their priests (who had no power of their own) seeking Power, seeking to harness it for their own ends.

But also in the cities, magic remained.

Humans were still born with special abilities, special senses. They learned not to talk about them, not to reveal that they were “different” – if they did, they were ostracized, driven out away from the general population. 

Veren was one such human.

Mutants were still born each year, but in smaller numbers than during the Awakening. Some infants were killed by their parents, and some were hidden away for a few years, abandoned when their differences could no longer be hidden. 

Jopie was one such child.

And in the wilds, humans and mutants continued to live in harmony, and to practice magic. But occasionally one would be born with a wild talent, something strong and different than what was normal for their village. They felt isolated, because there was no one to help them understand their gift. Some were driven mad by the visions they saw, others went in search of help when the visions became too much to handle.

Kestra was one such person.

 (Yeah, I know it’s too long. But the book is a long way from being finished so I have lots of time to work on it.)

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

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Rainbow Snippet for 2-22-2020

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from that “Steampunk Thing.” The first draft isn’t done yet and I’m hoping that this will keep me motivated to keep at it.

(Apologies for any language usage that’s anachronistic. I’ll deal with that once the first draft is done.)

This picks up from last week.

“I was also told to inform you that your grandfather will be dining at the table tonight as well.”

I saw her eyes light up. “He’s feeling better, then?” There was something in her voice that I couldn’t quite identify, not quite hope, but more as if she were scared to hope.

“He’s a bit stronger today,” James said slowly, obviously not trying to get her hopes up too much. “He’s at least wanting to be up and about.”

“That’s an improvement.”

“Indeed it is.” He shook his head at her boiler suit. “There’s a change of clothes for you in the carriage. Anne will be waiting to help you with your hair and makeup.”

“Come along, Mr. McKelvy,” my new boss said as she collected her cloak from a closet and swung it about her shoulders, lifting the hood up over her head. “You might as well meet the rest of the people in my employ so you know what you’re getting yourself into.” She paused and turned to look at me. “I’m sorry. I should have asked first. Is there someone waiting at home for you?”

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday Words #269 (2/19/2020)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

matches
a gold bag
a long road

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

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Sunday Snippet, February 16, 2020

More from the untitled WiP that I’ve been posting from.

This follows from last week’s snippet.

“We also hear that there are dangers here that are worse than anything in the Wilds,”

“For one such as you, answering a Call, most likely,” he replied. “But don’t worry.  When you go into the city I’ll come along.” She started to protest but he shook his head and held up a hand. “No arguments. You’ll need someone to guide you.”

He could see her accept the fact that she was not going to win this argument. “Thank you. You’re probably right.”  

“Of course he is,” a new voice said. “Veren is as knowledgeable in the ways of the city as you are in the ways of the Wilds.”

Veren turned and smiled, feeling his heart swell. “You are too kind,” he murmured, then glanced at Kestra to see her reaction.

 

I thought maybe I should post a bit of an explanation/blurb in progress for you to give you some sort of idea about the world I’m playing in for this:

Magic had reasserted itself. Banished for millennia, it could no longer be contained and erupted, bursting forth with a surge of power that had never been known before, and which, mercifully, has not been repeated since.

Unfortunately, no one believed in magic anymore, so no one knew what to do with it, not even those most directly affected: not those who had mutated overnight into creatures of legend, not those born as something other than human, not those who retained human but found themselves touched in other ways, with special powers and abilities.

Almost no one.

There were a few. A few who had held on to dreams and understandings, who believed in the things that others called fantasy. These few took roles as adepts, as teachers and counselors, leading the way into the new age.

There were some, of course, who rejected the changes. They persecuted the Abominations, as they called them, they drove them out of the cities and into the wilds.

And, gradually, a balance was achieved.

Sort of.

Outside the cities, in the wilds, there arose villages, their inhabitants, human and non, living together in peace and harmony with each other and with the natural world that was feared by the city dwellers.

In the cities, Tech ruled. But magic, or, rather, magic power, was not forgotten, nor entirely abandoned, and Temples grew, their priests (who had no power of their own) seeking Power, seeking to harness it for their own ends.

But also in the cities, magic remained.

Humans were still born with special abilities, special senses. They learned not to talk about them, not to reveal that they were “different” – if they did, they were ostracized, driven out away from the general population. 

Veren was one such human.

Mutants were still born each year, but in smaller numbers than during the Awakening. Some infants were killed by their parents, and some were hidden away for a few years, abandoned when their differences could no longer be hidden. 

Jopie was one such child.

And in the wilds, humans and mutants continued to live in harmony, and to practice magic. But occasionally one would be born with a wild talent, something strong and different than what was normal for their village. They felt isolated, because there was no one to help them understand their gift. Some were driven mad by the visions they saw, others went in search of help when the visions became too much to handle.

Kestra was one such person.

 (Yeah, I know it’s too long. But the book is a long way from being finished so I have lots of time to work on it.)

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

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Rainbow Snippet for 2-15-2020

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from that “Steampunk Thing.” The first draft isn’t done yet and I’m hoping that this will keep me motivated to keep at it.

(Apologies for any language usage that’s anachronistic. I’ll deal with that once the first draft is done.)

This picks up from last week.

Before she could reply the door opened and a man came in, accompanied by a blast of cold wet wind.

“Miss Vi…” The words died on his lips as he caught sight of me. “Pardon, ma’am. I didn’t know you had a visitor.”

She laughed cheerfully. “It’s all right. He’s not a visitor. I’ve just hired him to work with me on the ship. James, meet Mr. Daniel McKelvy. Mr. McKelvy, this is James White, my coachman, no doubt sent to fetch me home for supper.”

“A pleasure, Mr. McKelvy. And that would be correct, Miss.” There was a touch of humor about him that set me at ease, despite the feeling that I was far out of my league with these people. “I was also told to inform you that your grandfather will be dining at the table tonight as well.”

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday Words #268(2/12/2020)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

someone who looks familiar
a pillow
something long overdue

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

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Sunday Snippet, February 9, 2020

More from the untitled WiP that I’ve been posting from.

This follows from last week’s snippet.

“…No one wants a repeat of the Uprisings.”

Kestra nodded, understanding. After the Awakening, and after the Mutants had been driven away, there had been a war between the two factions.  Neither side had completely won, but an uneasy truce had been created.  

Veren was relieved that she knew the history. Since meeting Gundrin he was growing increasingly uncomfortable with the prejudice against Mutants and their segregation from Humans. This sanctuary was probably the last place in the city where Mutants were safe, and as he thought about what his Masters had planned for it he felt ill. 

“We also hear that there are dangers here that are worse than anything in the Wilds,” she said, changing the subject back to safer ground much to Veren’s relief.

I thought maybe I should post a bit of an explanation/blurb in progress for you to give you some sort of idea about the world I’m playing in for this:

Magic had reasserted itself. Banished for millennia, it could no longer be contained and erupted, bursting forth with a surge of power that had never been known before, and which, mercifully, has not been repeated since.

Unfortunately, no one believed in magic anymore, so no one knew what to do with it, not even those most directly affected: not those who had mutated overnight into creatures of legend, not those born as something other than human, not those who retained human but found themselves touched in other ways, with special powers and abilities.

Almost no one.

There were a few. A few who had held on to dreams and understandings, who believed in the things that others called fantasy. These few took roles as adepts, as teachers and counselors, leading the way into the new age.

There were some, of course, who rejected the changes. They persecuted the Abominations, as they called them, they drove them out of the cities and into the wilds.

And, gradually, a balance was achieved.

Sort of.

Outside the cities, in the wilds, there arose villages, their inhabitants, human and non, living together in peace and harmony with each other and with the natural world that was feared by the city dwellers.

In the cities, Tech ruled. But magic, or, rather, magic power, was not forgotten, nor entirely abandoned, and Temples grew, their priests (who had no power of their own) seeking Power, seeking to harness it for their own ends.

But also in the cities, magic remained.

Humans were still born with special abilities, special senses. They learned not to talk about them, not to reveal that they were “different” – if they did, they were ostracized, driven out away from the general population. 

Veren was one such human.

Mutants were still born each year, but in smaller numbers than during the Awakening. Some infants were killed by their parents, and some were hidden away for a few years, abandoned when their differences could no longer be hidden. 

Jopie was one such child.

And in the wilds, humans and mutants continued to live in harmony, and to practice magic. But occasionally one would be born with a wild talent, something strong and different than what was normal for their village. They felt isolated, because there was no one to help them understand their gift. Some were driven mad by the visions they saw, others went in search of help when the visions became too much to handle.

Kestra was one such person.

 (Yeah, I know it’s too long. But the book is a long way from being finished so I have lots of time to work on it.)

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

2 Comments

Filed under writing

Rainbow Snippet for 2-8-2020

rainbow logo 1

Rainbow Snippets is a group for LGBTQ+ authors, bloggers, and readers to gather once a week and share six sentences from a work of fiction–a WIP or a finished work or even a 6-sentence book recommendation (no spoilers please!).   Check out all the other awesome snippets by clicking on the picture above.

Still posting from that “Steampunk Thing.” The first draft isn’t done yet and I’m hoping that this will keep me motivated to keep at it.

(Apologies for any language usage that’s anachronistic. I’ll deal with that once the first draft is done.)

This picks up from last week.

“So, then, I’ll be seeing you first thing in the morning,” I said. I picked up my coat and cap from my bag of tools and prepared to go out into the weather.

“Were you planning on starting tonight?” she asked, noting my tool bag.

“I always take me tools when I’m out and about. They’re less likely to go missing that way.”  

She tilted her head.

“The lock on me door’s not the greatest. Neither’s my door. An’ my neighbors aren’t exactly the neighborly trustable sort.”

She nodded but didn’t press further.

“Do you have a long trip home?”

“I live in The Old Nichol, Miss.”

Before she could reply the door opened and a man came in, accompanied by a blast of cold wet wind.

*(The Old Nichol was one of the worst slums in London’s East End.)

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday Words #267 (2/5/2020)

Welcome to Wednesday Words!  Every Wednesday I will post some sort of prompt for a flash fiction piece.  The prompt will go live just after midnight Eastern time.

The prompt might be a picture, or it might be a list of things to include in a story, or maybe a phrase or a question or something from a “news of the weird” type thing, or a… who knows?

After that, it’s up to you.  But if you do use the prompt to write a bit of flash fiction (say, 500 words or so) I’d love to see what you came up with, so comment below with a link to where it is on your blog (or on WattPad or wherever).

(And a pingback to the post here where you found the prompt would be appreciated but isn’t necessary.)

Oh, and this isn’t a contest or anything.  It’s just a (hopefully) fun thing for all concerned.

And, hey, if it inspires more than 500 or so words, run with it!

This week’s snippet is a fragment of conversation overheard at Panera:

“They knew we were there.”

And, as always, I’d love to see what you come up with!

 

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Sunday Snippet, February 2, 2020

More from the untitled WiP that I’ve been posting from.

This follows from last week’s snippet.

“We have stories too, you know. One of them is that humans don’t interact with the other races.”

“Not much,” he admitted, then lowered his voice. “I don’t think it’s right. Gundrin…” He stopped, unwilling to reveal how much the Gnome’s kindness had come to mean to him in the brief time that he’d known him. He watched her intently, and was relieved when she didn’t pursue his comment.

She tilted her head curiously. “You wear a sword.  Aren’t there other weapons here, guns?”

“There are. They aren’t allowed, though, and when found they are destroyed, and the owners are executed. No one wants a repeat of the Uprisings.”

 

I thought maybe I should post a bit of an explanation/blurb in progress for you to give you some sort of idea about the world I’m playing in for this:

Magic had reasserted itself. Banished for millennia, it could no longer be contained and erupted, bursting forth with a surge of power that had never been known before, and which, mercifully, has not been repeated since.

Unfortunately, no one believed in magic anymore, so no one knew what to do with it, not even those most directly affected: not those who had mutated overnight into creatures of legend, not those born as something other than human, not those who retained human but found themselves touched in other ways, with special powers and abilities.

Almost no one.

There were a few. A few who had held on to dreams and understandings, who believed in the things that others called fantasy. These few took roles as adepts, as teachers and counselors, leading the way into the new age.

There were some, of course, who rejected the changes. They persecuted the Abominations, as they called them, they drove them out of the cities and into the wilds.

And, gradually, a balance was achieved.

Sort of.

Outside the cities, in the wilds, there arose villages, their inhabitants, human and non, living together in peace and harmony with each other and with the natural world that was feared by the city dwellers.

In the cities, Tech ruled. But magic, or, rather, magic power, was not forgotten, nor entirely abandoned, and Temples grew, their priests (who had no power of their own) seeking Power, seeking to harness it for their own ends.

But also in the cities, magic remained.

Humans were still born with special abilities, special senses. They learned not to talk about them, not to reveal that they were “different” – if they did, they were ostracized, driven out away from the general population. 

Veren was one such human.

Mutants were still born each year, but in smaller numbers than during the Awakening. Some infants were killed by their parents, and some were hidden away for a few years, abandoned when their differences could no longer be hidden. 

Jopie was one such child.

And in the wilds, humans and mutants continued to live in harmony, and to practice magic. But occasionally one would be born with a wild talent, something strong and different than what was normal for their village. They felt isolated, because there was no one to help them understand their gift. Some were driven mad by the visions they saw, others went in search of help when the visions became too much to handle.

Kestra was one such person.

 (Yeah, I know it’s too long. But the book is a long way from being finished so I have lots of time to work on it.)

 

Find more great reading
at the Sunday Snippet group.

 

1 Comment

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